Tag Archives | Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery

Beyond Eden Returns This Weekend


BEYOND EDEN
A multi-gallery event celebrating the New Contemporary Art Movement put together by Thinkspace

Beyond Eden_600x600 webLocation:
LA Municipal Art Gallery at Barnsdall Park
4800 Hollywood Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90027
www.beyondedenart.com

Schedule of events / viewing hours:
Saturday, October 3rd 6PM-11PM
Opening Reception with live painting & DJ Mr. NumberOnederful
$5 admission at the door / open to all

Sunday, October 4th Noon-5PM
Art viewing / Last chance to see the exhibition
$5 admission at the door / open to all

The fifth and final edition of Beyond Eden will once again be hosted by the Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery at Barnsdall Park this coming October. Beyond Eden is a multi-gallery event celebrating the New Contemporary art movement in Los Angeles put together by Andrew Hosner (co-owner / curator at Thinkspace) and made possible by the City Of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs. The public is invited to attend this special event and admission will be $5 and open to all.

Each successive Beyond Eden event grows larger and larger with combined average attendance well over 5,000 people for the past four years of the event. The New Contemporary Art Movement continues to build momentum on a national level and is finally starting to receive mainstream recognition from major institutions and publications the world over. With its foundation firmly planted in Southern California and a patron base here in Los Angeles that has been building over the past several decades, it’s easy to see why Beyond Eden has been welcomed with such open arms by the Los Angeles arts community and has become an anticipated annual event. It will be sad to see it go but due to rising costs associated with the City, we can simply no longer afford to put this on and have it live up to the standards of our past events. We plan to make this final event one for the history books and one you won’t soon forget.

Beyond Eden 2015 will showcase the works of five of California’s finest New Contemporary art galleries and will be held during the weekend of October 3rd and 4th with an opening night celebration planned for Saturday, October 3rd from 6-11PM. Participating galleries include C.A.V.E. Gallery (Venice, CA), Copro Gallery (Santa Monica, CA), Spoke Art (San Francisco, CA), Hashimoto Contempoary (San Francisco, CA) and event organizers Thinkspace (Culver City, CA).

In addition to the works on display from the participating galleries, Beyond Eden 2015 will also feature special solo showcases from both Meggs and Mear One. ‘Paving Paradise’ from Meggs will feature an array of new works from the Australian artist along with a large-scale painting / mural for all to enjoy. ‘Cognitive Dissonance’ from Mear One will showcase some of his largest and most iconic paintings to date.

Live painting demonstrations on the gallery’s balcony will also be taking place during the opening reception on Saturday night.

MEGGS 'Paving Paradise'

MEGGS ‘Paving Paradise’

MEAR ONE 'Cognitive Dissonance'

MEAR ONE ‘Cognitive Dissonance’


About the location:

The Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery opened in 1971 and is comprised of a 10,000 square foot Gallery and facility located on the sprawling grounds of Olive Hill in the Barnsdall Art Park. The park overlooks the City of Los Angeles and is also home to the famous, historic Frank Lloyd Wright Hollyhock House and Junior Art Center and Barnsdall Park Theatre. Under the Department of Cultural Affairs, LAMAG is the premier city-run gallery that focuses on contemporary art, particularly the work of living Southern California artists.

Presented by:
Arrested Motion
Cartwheel Art
City of LA Department of Cultural Affairs (DCA)
Hi-Fructose
Juxtapoz
Platinum Cheese
Reverberations Media
Sour Harvest
Supersonic Electronic

Official Website:
www.beyondedenart.com

Please be sure to join the Facebook page at:
www.facebook.com/groups/BeyondEden

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Andrew Hosner (Curatorial Director / Event Organizer)
contact@thinkspacegallery.com

TO RECEIVE PRESS UPDATES & TO REQUEST IMAGES PLEASE CONTACT:
Lee Joseph at Reverberations Media
T 818. 848.2698 F 818.848.2699
leejemail@gmail.com
www.reverberationsmedia.com

3/14 Curator + Juxtapoz Talk – Robert Williams + Jux Show LAMAG


Saturday March 14 – 2 PM
Curator / Juxtapoz Talk
Robert Williams: SLANG Aesthetics!
and 20 Years Under the Influence of Juxtapoz

Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery
Located at Barnsdall Park
4800 Hollywood Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90027
www.lamag.org

Saturday, March 14th 2 – 5 PM:
Curator / Juxtapoz Talk with Andrew Hosner, Gary Pressman, Greg Escalante, Robert Williams, and Gwynn Vitello

Head to the Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery ths Saturday, March 14 at 2 PM for a Curator and Juxtapoz Talk 20 Years Under the Influence of Juxtapoz celebrates the publication’s 20th anniversary. What once began as an alternative magazine, Juxtapoz is now themost widely disseminated art publication in the world. Predicated on the rejection of the artificial boundaries that consecrated “high Art”, Juxtapoz effectively broke down walls to allow young artists a chance at their own history.

ALSO! Saturday, March 28th 2 – 5 PM:
Book Signing for Robert Williams’ new book SLANG Aesthetics!

 

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NewJuxAd

Image Previews – 20 Years Under the Influence of Juxtapoz

Robert Williams:   SLANG Aesthetics! and 20 Years Under the Influence of Juxtapoz
Guest Curators: Andrew Hosner (Thinkspace)
& Gary Pressman (Copro Gallery)
Public First View: Sunday, February 22nd 2-5PM
On view: Sunday, February 22nd – April 19th, 2015
Gallery Hours 12-5 PM, Thursday – Sunday
Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery
Located at Barnsdall Park
4800 Hollywood Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90027
ADDITIONAL PROGRAMMING:
Sunday, Feb. 22nd 3PM: Movie Screening of Robert Williams’ Mr. Bitchin’ at the Barnsdall Gallery Theatre

Saturday, Feb. 28th 2PM: Artist Talk with Robert Williams

Saturday, March 14th 2PM: Curator / Juxtapoz Talk (with Andrew Hosner, Gary Pressman, Greg Escalante, Robert Williams, Suzanne Williams, Gwynn Vitello, Evan Pricco, and Jeff Soto)

Saturday, March 28th 2PM: Book Signing for Robert Williams’ new book SLANG Aesthetics! with Baby Tattoo

Juxtapoz_March_Robert-Williams_ad-2.sm NewJuxAd
Decline of Sophistication

Robert Williams – Decline of Sophistication

 

Shag- Summer of 76

Shag- Summer of 76

Margaret Keane - Flower Heads

Margaret Keane – Flower Heads

Kwon Kyung Yup - Love

Kwon Kyung Yup – Love

Jon Swihart  - Robert Williams

Jon Swihart – Robert Williams

Christine Wu - Possession

Christine Wu – Possession

Adam Miller - The Intruder

Adam Miller – The Intruder

2/22-4/19: Robert Williams SLANG Aesthetics! at LAMAG

Decline of Sophistication

Decline of Sophistication


Robert Williams: SLANG Aesthetics!
February 22nd – April 19th, 2015

Guest Curators: Andrew Hosner (Thinkspace)
& Gary Pressman (Copro Gallery)
Invitation Only Reception:
Saturday, February 21st from 6-11PM

*RSVP TO: rsvp@lamag.org

Public First View: Sunday, February 22nd 2-5PM

On view: Sunday, February 22nd – April 19th, 2015
Gallery Hours 12-5PM, Thursday – Sunday
Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery

FOR MORE INFORMATION – interview opportunities – images contact Lee Joseph at Reverberations Media


(Los Angeles) – The Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery and Juxtapoz magazine in association with Thinkspace Gallery and Copro Gallery are pleased to present new works by Robert Williams. SLANG Aesthetics! is on view at the Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery from February 22nd to April 19th, 2015. The exhibition is Robert Williams’ first major body of work to make its debut in Los Angeles in well over a decade, and will feature 25 new oil paintings by the artist alongside a suite of drawings, and a series of large-scale sculptures fabricated with the assistance of Gentle Giant Studios.

Robert Williams is widely upheld as the godfather of the low brow and pop surrealist art movements, and with as much frequency denigrated as an irreverent iconoclast among the arbiters of “high” art. As both patriarch and outlaw, Williams’ enduring influence on the New Contemporary movement is undeniable. A true maverick who sought to create vital work that channeled the shifting energies and immediacy of counterculture, from the 60’s onward, Williams’ paintings invoked a return to craftsmanship, figuration and demotic imagery that rejected the elitist tenets of conceptual minimalism. A kid of the 50’s, Williams grew up immersed in California’s hot rod Kustom Kulture, Rock n’ Roll and EC Comics, and was steeped in the populist currents of his era. He recognized the raw visual power of popular culture: its graphics, its counter movements and its undergrounds, a network of palpitations he would continue to tap well into the era of punk rock. He worked commercially and became studio Art Director to Kustom Kulture icon Ed “big daddy” Roth in 1965, and was a founding contributor to the underground ZAP Comix in the late 60’s, all the while creating his own caustic, unapologetic work.

The work that Williams’ created was different, and didn’t fit within the established critical and intellectual paradigms espoused by the East Coast dominated art scene. Creating epic cartoon inspired history paintings charged with sex and ultra-violence, Williams drew from the social power of the American vernacular and its visual slang. He refused the immaterial aspirations of the art object, as it moved further away from representation, and felt no affinity with the contentless legacy of Abstract Expressionism. Instead, Williams sought idiosyncrasy, content, narrative, skillful figuration and popular culture, and created work that captured its visceral and libidinal energies through accessible references. Williams continued to disregard the arbitrary exclusions of the low from “high” culture, and in 1979 coined the term “low brow” as a way to articulate his opposition to an establishment from which he was excluded. For better or worse, “low brow” became the namesake of a young fledgling art movement, which Williams would prove to be instrumental in fostering. In 1994 Williams founded Juxtapoz Art & Culture Magazine and created a platform for this young and insurgent energy on the West Coast; a publication that was dedicated to the underground and to its cultural mutineers.

Williams, a self described Conceptual Realist, continues to create artworks that elicit a response and offer an opinion. Relying on concrete, and relatable, imagery to invoke ideas and concepts, rather than on the non-comital spasms of abstraction, his work continues to cut, seethe, confront and move. Not for the faint of heart, Williams speaks an unruly truth that captures the dark, the beautiful and the appalling tenor of our modern world.

This exhibition is sponsored in part by the City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs and the Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery. The LAMAG is located within the beautiful Barnsdall Park at 4800 Hollywood Boulevard in Los Angeles, California. To contact the gallery please call 323.644.6269. Gallery hours are Thursday through Sunday from Noon to 5PM. For special tours and school groups, please contact Marta Feinstein at met_marta@sbcglobal.net or to arrange special adult tours, please contact Gabe Cifarelli at Gabriel.cifarelli@gmail.com – visit LAMAG on the web at www.lamag.org


Robert Williams ‘SLANG Aesthetics!’
Artist Statement

I have looked at the sizable accomplishments of the graffiti artists during the past thirty years and wondered how they were able to buck the powerful authorities that at one time channeled the direction and successes of the international art community. Artists like Keith Harring, Jean-Michel Basquiat, and Kenny Scharf have somehow skirted the requisite art movements of the sixties and seventies. What were the lax conditions that allowed these talented young artists to slip by without having to be abstract expressionists, conceptualists, or minimalists? The answer is that they didn’t sneak by. They rode the coattails of two other authentically approved art trends that had been long sanctioned: pop art and conceptual art’s little cousin, performance art.

But how sophisticated is graffiti? It is daring and exhibits loose spontaneous graphic public expression—the language of the people. At least some of the people, the street level, disenfranchised people. Is communication through street level art speak really sophisticated? And is inner city credibility (street cred) all that worthy for art buyers, art critics, museum curators, and foundation administrators? The solution is simple. The proper functionaries simply bestowed the coronet of sophistication on graffiti. Remember, graffiti to the general public is vandalism.

And, what about the other low level idioms of the graphic world? What about comic book cartoons, pulp magazine covers, hot rod art, biker art, tattoos, girly magazine photography, science fiction illustration, psychedelic poster art, surfer and skateboard art, and a myriad of other second class disciplines that don’t quite make the cut?

Maybe we might want to take a look at the entire concept of “sophistication”. Of course, sophistication is a credible behavioral classification. It denotes forethought, concern for ourselves and others, and continuing aspiration to better oneself. I would hope to achieve this personal status myself. But the word has easily been used to exemplify admittance to the privileged parade ground inside the ivory castle of the aloof, and from those pearly battlements the elite can command the cultural high ground. Two things have come to personify sophistication. One is the joint, or simultaneous agreement to defer authority to the consensus of success. Two is money. Both of these factors certainly sway public opinion.

The current international capital of artistic sophistication is New York City. Ever since the end of the second world war, every small city in the United States that has an art community has looked to New York for cultural parenting.

However, an interesting anomaly has developed over the years. “Sophistication”, like any other folkway, travels slowly with misinterpretations happening along the way. By the time high culture reached the west coast it had traded it’s Brooks Brothers suit for cut-offs, a Hawaiian shirt, and flip-flops. Art on the west coast, as much as it tries to maintain blue blood affectations, shows mutations. It just doesn’t have the aloof adroit coldness the eastern seaboard art society seems to portray. What’s even more amazing is the fine arts arbiters in the west can’t really comprehend the atrophy of snob status ebbing away right under their noses. This high class act of chic authority among art dealers is understandable as there is a constant inward flow of uneducated nouveau riche buyers seeking upper-class fulfillment through the arts. This is one reason some high art seems sophistically stupid.

Nonetheless, there is no place for blame. The human character will never change. In reality, art is not tangibly substantial enough to have real villains, just crackpots. Years ago, a New York art dealer told me, “Be careful with the fine arts world, it is real fragile”. How true. The art universe makes “smoke & mirrors” look like an impenetrable fortress. But, even with these delicate cultural shortcomings I’ve joyously participated in a life of creative adventure.

Art is quite possibly the largest and most profound cerebral playing field in all human endeavor. Art is exactly what you make of it.

Pablo Picasso said it best, “Sophistication is the greatest enemy of the imagination”. Sophistication as we and our parents knew it, is gone. Anything like that now is pure ego with quiche on it’s breath. With the internet, everything is changing so fast that slang and colloquialisms are as valid as the kings English. In fact, slang represents freedom from the pretension of sophistication. This leaves the artists in a position to function as they please.

Looking back, art history does have some curious ripples that have come from populist twentieth century trends. For example, take the German expressionists from around the period of just after the first world war. In 1919, Germany was in a state of extreme social and economical flux. The war had destroyed faith in the future, and earlier ideals were forsaken for a much more rightwing totalitarian Germany. A number of young artists surviving the horrors of war felt compelled to express an attitude that nothing could be worse than organized society. The brutal abstraction these artist portrayed paralleled the harsh injustices that power had fermented. By the 1930’s, the Nazi party had gained control of Germany on the platform of bringing organization back. The German expressionists were considered the very embodiment of the leftist sickness that modern anarchists endorsed. However, history has vindicated these rebels long after Adolf Hitler had them run out Germany.

They painted in a style of colloquial vulgarity that lead to the liberation of the entire art world some fifty years later. There are many examples of their work that are still considered too controversial today.

Another poignant incident in popular graphic history that has gone basically forgotten is the Dr. Wertham comic book hearings in the United States Senate during the McCarthy era of the 1950’s. In 1952, Dr. Fridric Wertham came out with a best selling book titled, Seduction of the Innocent. It was about the evils of comic books.

It wasn’t long before there was a senate investigation exploring the effects comics had on creating juvenile delinquency. It must be pointed out that at this point in time the entire orthodox art world was hypnotically wallowing in abstract expressionism and the virtuosity of drawing and draftsmanship was considered illustration. The art cognoscenti thought of comic books as low class commercial art.

Nonetheless, some of the finest writers and draftsmen were put on the senate chopping block. It took twenty years for comic books to regain their former dignity. As a form of vengeance to this governmental suppression, underground comix sprang to life in the 1960’s. The tolerant use of modern creative expression has placed sophistication in the same category as an Emily Post dissertation on proper dining etiquette. “On which side of your melon spoon do you place your caviar fork”?

During the last fifteen years comics, (now known as graphic novels), have completely dominated international culture through movies, television, and the internet. And still the art authorities and critics insulate themselves from comic book influence by securing their untouchable status behind a thin membrane of sophistication. The only justification that would seem to be credible for these pretenses by art actuators is that sophistication is a form of performance art—something along the lines of visiting a homeless encampment and affecting airs of an eighteenth century French Bourbon king.

The cartoon, a form of simple visual presentation, is the most versatile and malleable form of communication in the recorded vocabulary of art. Anything that can be imagined or thought up can be best abstracted or translated by cartoon. Yet the lowly cartoon, with it’s giant vernacular, is treated like a doodle. With art, the bottom will always come to the top. The strongest creative urges seem to be basic and euphemistic, or, simply, ‘slang aesthetics’.

2/22 – 4/19: 20 Years Under the Influence of Juxtapoz @ LAMAG


20 Years Under the Influence of Juxtapoz
Guest Curators: Andrew Hosner (Thinkspace) & Gary Pressman (Copro Gallery)
February 22nd – April 19th, 2015
Invitation Only Reception: Saturday, February 21st from 6-11PM

*RSVP TO: rsvp@lamag.org

Public First View: Sunday, February 22nd 2-5PM

On view: Sunday, February 22nd – April 19th, 2015
Gallery Hours 12-5PM, Thursday – Sunday

ADDITIONAL PROGRAMMING:
Saturday, March 14th 2PM: Curator / Juxtapoz Talk (with Andrew Hosner, Gary Pressman, Greg Escalante, Robert Williams, Suzanne Williams, Gwynn Vitello, Evan Pricco, and Jeff Soto)

FOR MORE INFORMATION – interview opportunities – images
contact Lee Joseph at Reverberations Media

 

NewJuxAd

(Los Angeles) – The Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery and Juxtapoz magazine are pleased to present 20 Years Under the Influence of Juxtapoz, a group exhibition to commemorate two decades of the magazine’s influential contribution to contemporary art and culture. On view at the Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery, and curated by Andrew Hosner of Thinkspace Gallery and Gary Pressman of Copro Gallery, the exhibition features close to one hundred artists who have graced the publication’s pages and website, and showcases the diversity and breadth of the New Contemporary movement Juxtapoz has championed and helped to uphold.

In 1994 in San Francisco, Robert Williams, Craig Stecyk, Greg Escalante, Eric Swenson and Fausto Vitello founded Juxtapoz with the intent of fostering the art and culture of the underground. Providing an alternative voice and narrative as a counterpart to the dominant New York-centric discourse of contemporary art, it featured artists who straddled “high” and “low” culture. Aligning itself with the aesthetics of contemporary street culture, figurative art, California car culture, gig posters, tattoos, graphics, psychedelia and comics, the publication became a conduit and forum for an entirely new generation of artists who were latching on to the visual vernacular of powerfully populist themes. At a time when representational forms of art were widely disparaged by the reigning critical discourse of the art world, a discourse which championed hyper-conceptual and minimalist dogmas, Juxtapoz provided a mouth piece for the New Contemporary movement. Fluid rather than prescriptive, this movement has many monikers but is united by an ethos. The expressive possibilities afforded by figurative or representational work came to the fore, and a democratic sensibility was unleashed.

What once began as an alternative magazine is now the most widely disseminated art publication in the world. Predicated on the rejection of the artificial boundaries that consecrated “high”, Juxtapoz effectively broke down walls to allow young artists a chance at their own history. It is also an ideal that attests to the power of making accessible art about shared cultural experiences, identities and aesthetics.

The artists featured in this exhibition have been chosen based for their impact on the movement, and on how they themselves have been motivated by such an abundance of inspiration. With access to this imagery and community, new and multifaceted generations of artists continue to emerge from the ranks. Avenues made possible by Juxtapoz, through its wide variety of featured media and expressions, have shaped this aesthetic and preserves its trajectory as far as the imagination will allow.

Full lineup of participating artists in 20 Years Under the Influence of Juxtapoz:

Aaron Horkey
Aaron Nagel
Adam Caldwell
Adam Miller
Alex Yanes
Amy Sol
Andrew Hem
Andrew Schoultz
Andy Kehoe
Anthony Ausgang
Aron Wiesenfeld
Audrey Kawasaki
Bezt
Billy Norrby
Brendan Monroe
Brett Amory
Brian M. Viveros
bumblebeelovesyou
C215
Candice Tripp
Chet Zar
Chris Mars
Christine Wu
CR Stecyk
Cryptik
Curiot
Dabs Myla
Dan Quintana
Dave MacDowell
David Cooley
David Molesky
EINE
Elizabeth McGrath
Eric Fortune
Erik Jones
Ernest Zacharevic
Esao Andrews
Femke Hiemstra
Fuco Ueda
Glenn Barr
Heidi Tailifer
Henrik Aa. Uldalen
Jacub Gagnon
James Marshall
Jeff Ramirez
Jeff Soto
Jeremy Fish
Jim Houser
Joanne Nam
Joao Ruas
Joe Sorren
Joe Vaux
John Brophy
Jon Swihart
Joram Roukes
Josh Keyes
Kazu Tsuji
Kevin Peterson
Kikyz 1313
Know Hope
Kozyndan
Kris Kuksi
KuKula
Kwon Kyung-yup
Linnea Strid
Low Bros
Luke Chueh
Luke Hillestad
Marco Mazzoni
Margaret Keane
Mark Dean Veca
Mark Garro
Mark Ryden
Matt Dangler
Michael Hussar
Mike Davis
Miss Van
Naoto Hattori
Natalia Fabia
Niagara
Nick Sheehy
Nicola Verlato
Nikko Hurtado
Nosego
Odd Nerdrum
Peter Ferguson
Rob Sato
Robert S. Connett
Ryan Heshka
Sainer
Sandra Chevrier
Scott Radke
Sergio Garcia
Seth Armstrong
Shag (Josh Agle)
Shepard Fairey
Tara McPherson
Tran Nguyen
Tristan Eaton
Troy Coulterman
Word To Mother
Yoko d’Holbachie
Yosuke Ueno

This exhibition is sponsored in part by the City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs and the Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery. The LAMAG is located within the beautiful Barnsdall Park at 4800 Hollywood Boulevard in Los Angeles, California. To contact the gallery please call 323.644.6269. Gallery hours are Thursday through Sunday from Noon to 5PM. For special tours and school groups, please contact Marta Feinstein at met_marta@sbcglobal.net or to arrange special adult tours, please contact Gabe Cifarelli at Gabriel.cifarelli@gmail.com – visit LAMAG on the web at www.lamag.org

FOR MORE INFORMATION – interview opportunities – images
contact Lee Joseph at Reverberations Media

Margaret Keane added to Juxtapoz 20th at LAMAG

Living legend and major influence on the lowbrow and pop surrealist art movements, Margaret Keane, has just been added to the lineup of 20 Years Under the Influence of Juxtapoz! group show – What with Keane’s involvement in the already epic Juxtapoz group show and Robert Williams‘ headlining solo show SLANG Aesthetics! – the Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery will be housing one of the most important shows the movements have seen yet!

Juxtapoz_March_Robert-Williams_ad-2.sm Juxtapoz_March_20-YEARS-JUX_sm

Robert Williams: SLANG Aesthetics!
and 20 Years Under the Influence of Juxtapoz

Guest Curators: Andrew Hosner (Thinkspace)
& Gary Pressman (Copro Gallery)

VIP Private Preview Reception: Sat., February 21st, 2015 6-11PM
(RSVP will be required / details to follow)
Public First View: Sun., February 22nd, 2015 2-5PM
Exhibition Runs: February 21st – April 19th, 2015

Taking Place At:
Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery
Located at Barnsdall Park
4800 Hollywood Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90027
www.lamag.org

Artist List for 20 Years Under The Influence Of Juxtapoz:

• Aaron Horkey
• Aaron Nagel
• Adam Caldwell
• Adam Miller
• Alex Yanes
• Amy Sol
• Andrew Hem
• Andrew Schoultz
• Andy Kehoe
• Anthony Ausgang
• Aron Wiesenfeld
• Audrey Kawasaki
• Billy Norrby
• Brendan Monroe
• Brett Amory (FEATURED INSTALLATION)
• Brian M. Viveros
• bumblebeelovesyou
• C215
• Candice Tripp
• Chet Zar
• Chris Mars
• Christine Wu
• CR Stecyk
• Cryptik
• Curiot
• D*Face
• Dabs Myla
• Dalek (aka James Marshall)
• Dan Quintana
• Dave MacDowell
• David Cooley
• David Molesky
• EINE
• Ekundayo
• Elizabeth McGrath
• Eric Fortune
• Erik Jones
• Ernest Zacharevic
• Esao Andrews
• Femke Hiemstra
• Fuco Ueda
• Glenn Barr
• Heidi Tailifer
• Henrik Aa. Uldalen
• Jacub Gagnon
• Jeff Ramirez
• Jeff Soto
• Jeremy Fish
• Jim Houser
• Joanne Nam
• Joao Ruas
• Joe Sorren
• Joe Vaux
• John Brophy
• Jolene Lai
• Joram Roukes
• Josh Keyes
• Kazu Tsuji
• Kevin Peterson
• Kikyz 1313
• KNOW HOPE
• Kozyndan
• Kris Kuksi
• KuKula
• Kwon Kyungyup
• Linnea Strid
• Low Bros
• Luke Chueh
• Luke Hillistead
• Marco Mazzoni
• Margaret Keane
• Mark Dean Veca
• Mark Garro
• Mark Ryden
• Matt Dangler
• Meggs
• Michael Hussar
• Mike Davis
• Miss Van
• Naoto Hattori
• Natalia Fabia
• Niagra
• Nick Sheehy
• Nicola Verlato
• Nikko Hurtado
• Nosego
• Odd Nerdrum
• Peter Ferguson
• Rob Sato
• Robert S. Connett
• Ryan Heshka
• Sandra Chevrier
• Scott Radke
• Sergio Garcia
• Seth Armstrong
• SHAG (Josh Agle)
• Shepard Fairey
• Tara McPherson
• Tran Nguyen
• Tristan Eaton
• Troy Coulterman
• Word To Mother
• Yoko d’Holbachie
• Yosuke Ueno

Robert Williams SLANG Aesthetics! and Juxtapoz 20th


Robert Williams: SLANG Aesthetics!
and 20 Years Under the Influence of Juxtapoz

Guest Curators: Andrew Hosner (Thinkspace)
& Gary Pressman (Copro Gallery)

VIP Private Preview Reception: Sat., February 21st, 2015 6-11PM
(RSVP required to rsvp@lamag.org)
Public First View: Sun., February 22nd, 2015 2-5PM
Exhibition Runs: February 21st – April 19th, 2015
Taking Place At:
Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery
Located at Barnsdall Park
4800 Hollywood Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90027

Robt. Williams_lgoo

The Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery and Juxtapoz magazine are pleased to present new works by Robert Williams in SLANG Aesthetics! in conjunction with 20 Years Under the Influence of Juxtapoz, a group exhibition by guest curators Andrew Hosner of Thinkspace Gallery and Gary Pressman of Copro Gallery. Both exhibitions will be on view at the Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery from February 22nd to April 19th, 2015. These two exhibitions commemorate the 20th anniversary of Juxtapoz magazine, founded by Williams in 1994, and it’s vast influence on several generations of artists.
 Williams_The Everywhere at Once Cabriolet_small

Robert Williams is widely upheld as the godfather of the low brow and pop surrealist art movements, and with as much frequency denigrated as an irreverent iconoclast among the arbiters of “high” art. As both patriarch and outlaw, Williams’ enduring influence on the New Contemporary movement is undeniable. A true maverick who sought to create vital work that channeled the shifting energies and immediacy of counterculture, from the 60’s onward, Williams’ paintings invoked a return to craftsmanship, figuration and demotic imagery that rejected the elitist tenets of conceptual minimalism. In 1994 Williams founded Juxtapoz Art & Culture Magazine and created a platform for this young and insurgent energy on the West Coast; a publication that was dedicated to the underground and to its cultural mutineers. Williams, a self described Conceptual Realist, continues to create artworks that elicit a response and offer an opinion. Relying on concrete, and relatable, imagery to invoke ideas and concepts, rather than on the non-comital spasms of abstraction, his work continues to cut, seethe, confront and move. Not for the faint of heart, Williams speaks an unruly truth that captures the dark, the beautiful and the appalling tenor of our modern world. SLANG Aesthetics! is Robert Williams’ first major body of work to debut in Los Angeles in well over a decade, and will feature 25 new oil paintings by the artist alongside a suite of drawings, and a series of large-scale sculptures fabricated with the assistance of Gentle Giant Studios.

In conjunction with Williams’ new exhibition of work, 20 Years Under the Influence of Juxtapoz celebrates the publication’s 20th anniversary. What once began as an alternative magazine, Juxtapoz is now the most widely disseminated art publication in the world. Predicated on the rejection of the artificial boundaries that consecrated “high”, Juxtapoz effectively broke down walls to allow young artists a chance at their own history. It is also an ideal that attests to the power of making accessible art about shared cultural experiences, identities and aesthetics. The magazine has helped to define and bring to light one of the most exciting art movements of our time, an incipient movement in 1994 that has now, finally 20 years later, begun to infiltrate the mainstream art markets and institutions from which it had once been excluded. It is also a movement with a massive fan following that attests to the power, and relevance, of making accessible art about shared cultural experiences, identities and aesthetics. The artists featured in this exhibition have been chosen based for their impact on the movement, and on how they themselves have been motivated by such an abundance of inspiration. With access to this imagery and community, new and multifaceted generations of artists continue to emerge from the ranks. Avenues made possible by Juxtapoz, through its wide variety of featured media and expressions, have shaped this aesthetic and preserves its trajectory as far as the imagination will allow.

This exhibition is sponsored in part by the City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs and the Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery. The LAMAG is located within the beautiful Barnsdall Park at 4800 Hollywood Boulevard in Los Angeles, California. To contact the gallery please call 323.644.6269. Gallery hours are: Thursday through Sunday from Noon to 5PM. For special tours and school groups, please contact Marta Feinstein at met_marta@sbcglobal.net or to arrange special adult tours, please contact Gabe Cifarelli at Gabriel.cifarelli@gmail.com – visit LAMAG on the web at www.lamag.org

Artist List for 20 Years Under The Influence Of Juxtapoz:

• Aaron Horkey
• Aaron Nagel
• Adam Caldwell
• Adam Miller
• Alex Yanes
• Amy Sol
• Andrew Hem
• Andrew Schoultz
• Andy Kehoe
• Anthony Ausgang
• Aron Wiesenfeld
• Audrey Kawasaki
• Billy Norrby
• Brendan Monroe
• Brett Amory (FEATURED INSTALLATION)
• Brian M. Viveros
• bumblebeelovesyou
• C215
• Candice Tripp
• Chet Zar
• Chris Mars
• Christine Wu
• CR Stecyk
• Cryptik
• Curiot
• D*Face
• Dabs Myla
• Dalek (aka James Marshall)
• Dan Quintana
• Dave MacDowell
• David Cooley
• David Molesky
• EINE
• Ekundayo
• Elizabeth McGrath
• Eric Fortune
• Erik Jones
• Ernest Zacharevic
• Esao Andrews
• Femke Hiemstra
• Fuco Ueda
• Glenn Barr
• Heidi Tailifer
• Henrik Aa. Uldalen
• Jacub Gagnon
• Jeff Ramirez
• Jeff Soto
• Jeremy Fish
• Jim Houser
• Joanne Nam
• Joao Ruas
• Joe Sorren
• Joe Vaux
• John Brophy
• Jolene Lai
• Joram Roukes
• Josh Keyes
• Kazu Tsuji
• Kevin Peterson
• Kikyz 1313
• KNOW HOPE
• Kozyndan
• Kris Kuksi
• KuKula
• Kwon Kyungyup
• Linnea Strid
• Low Bros
• Luke Chueh
• Luke Hillistead
• Marco Mazzoni
• Margaret Keane
• Mark Dean Veca
• Mark Garro
• Mark Ryden
• Matt Dangler
• Meggs
• Michael Hussar
• Mike Davis
• Miss Van
• Naoto Hattori
• Natalia Fabia
• Niagra
• Nick Sheehy
• Nicola Verlato
• Nikko Hurtado
• Nosego
• Odd Nerdrum
• Peter Ferguson
• Rob Sato
• Robert S. Connett
• Ryan Heshka
• Sandra Chevrier
• Scott Radke
• Sergio Garcia
• Seth Armstrong
• SHAG (Josh Agle)
• Shepard Fairey
• Tara McPherson
• Tran Nguyen
• Tristan Eaton
• Troy Coulterman
• Word To Mother
• Yoko d’Holbachie
• Yosuke Ueno

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