Tag Archives | Bruce Eichelberger

12/1: La Luz de Jesus 31st Anniversary Drawing Show


31st Anniversary Drawing Show
Exhibition: December 1-31
Reception: Fri. Dec. 1, 8-11 PM

La Luz de Jesus Gallery
4633 Hollywood Blvd,
Los Angeles, CA 90027
www.laluzdejesus.com

Artist list: Nathan Anderson, Ana Bagayan, Paul Barnes, Vicki Berndt, Andrew Brandou, Mark Bodnar, Jessica Dalva, Jason D’Aquino, Dave Dexter, Daniel Martin Diaz, Jorge Dos Diablos, Bruce Eichelberger, Frau Sakra, Damian Fulton, Mark Gleason, Derek Harrison, Scott Holloway, Karen Hydendahl, Stephanie Inagaki, Yumiko Kayukawa, Mariam Keurjikian, Zoe Lacchei, Craig LaRotonda, Tracy Lewis, Justine Lin, Lizz Lopez, Danni Shinya Luo, Patrick McGrath Muñiz, Junko Mizuno, Chris B. Murray, Michael Murphy, Mayuko Nakamura, Annie Owens, Rob Reger / Emily the Strange, Van Saro, Deirdre Sullivan-Beeman, Christopher Ulrich, Mel Weiner, Jasmine Worth, Daphne Yap.

2017 is La Luz de Jesus’ 31st year of continuous, monthly exhibitions. Think about that: La Luz de Jesus Gallery is 31 years old!

Some of the artists in this show weren’t even born yet when Billy Shire decided to clear out the storage apartment at the corner of Melrose and Martel, upstairs from his flagship Soap Plant shop with marked purpose. His vision: to showcase the incredible, ethnic folk art he brought back from Mexico, Guatemala, and museum quality pieces from Asia and elsewhere alongside that of his talented friends–people who were finding a hard time being taken seriously by the art establishment of the era in spite of their technical prowess. His experiment has spawned a legacy. The renewed interest in illustration art resultant from his gallery’s success influenced the zeitgeist, and launched industries. The lowbrow movement of California Art (which in turn informed the Pop Surrealists that followed) influenced fashion, television, film and culture. The rest, as they say, is history.

The 31st Anniversary Drawing Show is an invitational event that traces the history of Post-Pop in its birthplace.

We chose from the best illustrators featured in the 31-year history of La Luz de Jesus to create a new, original drawing for this show, allowing us to trace a line all the way from Robert Williams to Annie Owens.

Since this is a drawing show, the work will be graphite, charcoal, colored pencil, ink or ballpoint pen, watercolor and/or gouache on paper. Whatever the preferred technique, the dominant medium of expression will classify the work as a drawing. All works are 16×20″ or smaller before framing.

Preview the entire show at this link

 

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Sex, Death, Science and Religion with Bruce Eichelberger


Bruce Eichelberger – The Anatomy Lesson – studio visit March 2016

BruceEichleburger_2016 (9)Tell us about the show’s concept and influences.
BE:  It’s about death, sex, science, religion – a lot of science and religion. Matt Kennedy (La Luz de Jesus gallery director) named the show. My art is inspired by my views on religion. I’m an atheist myself (says Bruce’s wife Bebe “I’m Catholic, we’re one with and one without religion… We tell each other our views and thoughts… I love it !!) and it’s bumming me out seeing how much religion is affecting our politics. That influences a lot of my stuff, how religion and government has affected all of us and we go along with it, we’re happy with everything. I’m trying not to be duped. I’ve always had this passion about science being in a battle with religion for thousands of years. Science was starting to prevail a little bit now I’m watching it being shoved back. That’s really where I’m at is that war with science and religion.

Tell us about this (assemblage) piece:
BE: That’s called “In the Beginning”, it’s a little play on Adam and Eve – that was more for my entertainment – I was inspired by Tilman Riemenschneider’s inlay work.
What inspired you to use a human hand?
BE: This may sound boring but, It fits there.

LaLuzBruceKryss26

What sort of items are you using in this show? Give an example of what you use, and your process.
BE: The inlays contain some golden hearts, purple hearts, some mahogany, silver, bones. I’ll start with the figure, and I”ll draw it out on a piece of throwaway wood – a piece of wood I don’t care about. I’ll draw it out then I’ll section it with a pencil – draw where I want the cuts, will make the cuts then I”ll line up the cuts on the throwaway wood I’ll line it up on good hardwood, and slowly put the picture together.

And the Camel skull?
BE: I will do an outline in pencil, then ink the skull with the tiny brushes. Once I have my outline I just flow. A week later it may change. I can’t keep focusing on one theme, by the time I to the lower part of the piece, something else is happening (note – in Bruce’s personal life or in the news) and that gets incorporated into the piece. Once the piece is finished I’ll sprays it with a sealant – that stuff is amazing. This (points to another piece) was painted years ago and there’s no damage

Tell us more about “72 Reasons”, the Camel skull piece.
BE: This started out 72 Reasons out of Raisins. I was listening to an Arabic scholar -not a biblical scholar but a scholar on the Arabic Language, he was giving this lecture and was talking about the 72 virgins thing – the promise of 72 virgins after a suicide bomber blows himself up. This guy said, it can be read several ways – it can be twisted and most likely translate to “you can receive 72 grapes”… somebody got virgins out of it…. They are probably going to get grapes.

How do you know when you are finished with a piece
BE: Once it’s covered and I’m happy with everything, once I get to my last bit of outline it’s over – I know not to go any further – I used to be able to spend a lot of time obsessing but not anymore. Once I have my outline I just flow. (Note: Bruce works on a sort of improvisational level – his themes may change while working on a piece.)

Tell us about these femurs -How do you keep your figures consistent around the curves?
BE: The Femurs are inspired by one of one of my favorite authors, George Orwell – that one is based on “1984” . Once I saw the femurs i thought I could fit a lot of stuff on there. Once I hit the apex on the curve, I have to do a lot of corrections with a razor blade

What did you use to create “Decay”?
BE: Abalone – Preciosa, silver, ironwood, mahogany, rosewood, petrified mammoth

Does “Decay” have a particular theme or inspiration?
She (note: his wife Bebe) was trying to get me to quit smoking.

Bruce Eichelberger’s The Anatomy Lesson opens at La Luz de Jesus Gallery on April 1 8-11 PM with Krystopher Sapp’s The Great American Horror Show and remains up through May 1. Preview both shows at this link.

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4/1: Bruce Eichelberger – The Anatomy Lesson at La Luz de Jesus


Bruce Eichelberger – The Anatomy Lesson
Showing with Krystopher Sapp – The Great American Horror Show

April 1 – May 1, 2016
Opening reception: Friday, April 1st, 8-11PM
La Luz de Jesus Gallery
Soap Plant / Wacko
4633 Hollywood Blvd,
Los Angeles, CA 90027
www.laluzdejesus.com

Bruce Eichelberger – The Anatomy Lesson
Bruce Eichelberger combines techniques of sculpting and pyrography, and has produced incredibly detailed pieces from objects as disparate as guitars and human skulls. The hours poured into such pieces are indicative of the artist’s commitment to quality, and his yield is endowed with an ability scarcely seen in untrained work. Bruce’s life story is one of personal triumph over tragedy–an inspiring tale of redemption that evidences greatness in the classical, visionary tradition. His drawings have been showcased in the Harwood Museum in Taos, New Mexico, and Le Halle St. Pierre in Paris, France, and can be found in some of the most important collections of self-taught art in the world.

 

 

 

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4/1: Krystopher Sapp – The Great American Horror Show


Krystopher Sapp – The Great American Horror Show
Showing with Bruce Eichelberger – The Anatomy Lesson

April 1 – May 1, 2016
Opening reception: Friday, April 1st, 8-11PM
La Luz de Jesus Gallery
Soap Plant / Wacko
4633 Hollywood Blvd,
Los Angeles, CA 90027
www.laluzdejesus.com

Krystopher Sapp – The Great American Horror Show
Like another famous and similarly named artist, Krystopher Sapp works primarily in assemblage. Each has been at it for about the same amount time, and their matching first names (and unusual spellings of each) are one of the great coincidences of the contemporary Post-Pop art world.

Sapp’s work is much more dangerous.

Krystopher Sapp grew up in a household of memorabilia. His father has been a respected collector and dealer of movie goods for decades and his mother is one of the very few restorers trusted by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. As one might expect, his knowledge of classic film runs deep and his lexicon is large. The Great American Horror Show is a tribute to his favorite films from his favorite genre, and avoiding cliché has become his trademark.

 

 

 

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