Tag Archives | Assemblage

Friday 1/5: D.W. Marino – Burning Optimism at La Luz de Jesus


D.W. Marino – Burning Optimism
Showing with Valerie Pobjoy and Scott Rohlfs
Exhibition: January 5-28
Reception: Fri. Jan. 5, 8-11 PM

La Luz de Jesus Gallery
4633 Hollywood Blvd,
Los Angeles, CA 90027
www.laluzdejesus.com

 

D.W. Marino – Burning Optimism

D.W. Marino majored in graphic arts in college but dropped out after 2 years. His first job was drawing ejection seats for a defense contractor. He toiled at different scientific firms doing technical illustration, typography, color proofing and layout as well as some catalog design work in NYC and label design in San Francisco. Yearning for something different, he started working at a neon sign shop and this leap from working in 2D to 3D led to a series of bomb Christmas ornaments.

While making these ornaments his wife, Allie, was diagnosed with cancer. As a distraction, the two came up with themes for bombs and mounted them in boxes. “We’d sit and talk about a tiki bomb, a Hello Kitty bomb, or Everyone hates clowns…why not bomb them!” The list went on and on, becoming something to focus on that took their minds away from the stress and strain of difficult circumstances.

The “Bombardment” series became the artist’s trademark.

Marino’s dad was a Nuclear Physicist in the weapons industry and was a member of the Sierra Club, so the irony of presenting an anti-war message in sardonic drag presents an evergreen pool of inspiration that is as much rooted in his childhood in the San Francisco Bay Area and the psychedelic art of that period as in his own experience in the munitions industry.

Close observers will notice the tropes of record album covers, the colorful pop art of Peter Max, and the underground comix work of artists Rick Griffen, R. Crumb, Stanley Mouse, Alton Kelley, and Gilbert Shelton–all given a new, multi-dimensional surface and context.

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6/2 – 7/2: Intricate sculptures of Christopher Bales at La Luz de Jesus


Christopher Bales
showing with
Nathan Anderson, Howard Hallis, & Gea*
June 2 – July 2, 2017

Opening Reception: Friday, June 2nd, 8-11 PM

La Luz de Jesus Gallery
4633 Hollywood Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90027
www.laluzdejesus.com

It seems cheap to pigeonhole assemblage artist Christopher Bales’ work as mere steampunk: his aesthetic is older than that. Although he sometimes uses antique and vintage materials associated with the genre, such as metal cogs, the final product often looks more like an altar constructed from the rubble of a pre-Victorian cathedral.

Bales, who has been assembling these intricate sculptures since 1989, said he sources “an enormous amount of objects”—like broken wooden boxes, dolls, clocks, picture frames, figurines—from his weekly visits to flea markets and thrift stores.

When he starts a new piece, he says he doesn’t have a preconceived notion of what the end result will be, but following his intuition when layering cutouts of classic paintings over etchings with skulls and religious imagery creates enough detail for the viewer to stay engaged but not overwhelmed. –Sacramento Bee

Hope, Fear and the Journey to Earth is Christopher Bales third feature exhibition at La Luz de Jesus Gallery.

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Sex, Death, Science and Religion with Bruce Eichelberger


Bruce Eichelberger – The Anatomy Lesson – studio visit March 2016

BruceEichleburger_2016 (9)Tell us about the show’s concept and influences.
BE:  It’s about death, sex, science, religion – a lot of science and religion. Matt Kennedy (La Luz de Jesus gallery director) named the show. My art is inspired by my views on religion. I’m an atheist myself (says Bruce’s wife Bebe “I’m Catholic, we’re one with and one without religion… We tell each other our views and thoughts… I love it !!) and it’s bumming me out seeing how much religion is affecting our politics. That influences a lot of my stuff, how religion and government has affected all of us and we go along with it, we’re happy with everything. I’m trying not to be duped. I’ve always had this passion about science being in a battle with religion for thousands of years. Science was starting to prevail a little bit now I’m watching it being shoved back. That’s really where I’m at is that war with science and religion.

Tell us about this (assemblage) piece:
BE: That’s called “In the Beginning”, it’s a little play on Adam and Eve – that was more for my entertainment – I was inspired by Tilman Riemenschneider’s inlay work.
What inspired you to use a human hand?
BE: This may sound boring but, It fits there.

LaLuzBruceKryss26

What sort of items are you using in this show? Give an example of what you use, and your process.
BE: The inlays contain some golden hearts, purple hearts, some mahogany, silver, bones. I’ll start with the figure, and I”ll draw it out on a piece of throwaway wood – a piece of wood I don’t care about. I’ll draw it out then I’ll section it with a pencil – draw where I want the cuts, will make the cuts then I”ll line up the cuts on the throwaway wood I’ll line it up on good hardwood, and slowly put the picture together.

And the Camel skull?
BE: I will do an outline in pencil, then ink the skull with the tiny brushes. Once I have my outline I just flow. A week later it may change. I can’t keep focusing on one theme, by the time I to the lower part of the piece, something else is happening (note – in Bruce’s personal life or in the news) and that gets incorporated into the piece. Once the piece is finished I’ll sprays it with a sealant – that stuff is amazing. This (points to another piece) was painted years ago and there’s no damage

Tell us more about “72 Reasons”, the Camel skull piece.
BE: This started out 72 Reasons out of Raisins. I was listening to an Arabic scholar -not a biblical scholar but a scholar on the Arabic Language, he was giving this lecture and was talking about the 72 virgins thing – the promise of 72 virgins after a suicide bomber blows himself up. This guy said, it can be read several ways – it can be twisted and most likely translate to “you can receive 72 grapes”… somebody got virgins out of it…. They are probably going to get grapes.

How do you know when you are finished with a piece
BE: Once it’s covered and I’m happy with everything, once I get to my last bit of outline it’s over – I know not to go any further – I used to be able to spend a lot of time obsessing but not anymore. Once I have my outline I just flow. (Note: Bruce works on a sort of improvisational level – his themes may change while working on a piece.)

Tell us about these femurs -How do you keep your figures consistent around the curves?
BE: The Femurs are inspired by one of one of my favorite authors, George Orwell – that one is based on “1984” . Once I saw the femurs i thought I could fit a lot of stuff on there. Once I hit the apex on the curve, I have to do a lot of corrections with a razor blade

What did you use to create “Decay”?
BE: Abalone – Preciosa, silver, ironwood, mahogany, rosewood, petrified mammoth

Does “Decay” have a particular theme or inspiration?
She (note: his wife Bebe) was trying to get me to quit smoking.

Bruce Eichelberger’s The Anatomy Lesson opens at La Luz de Jesus Gallery on April 1 8-11 PM with Krystopher Sapp’s The Great American Horror Show and remains up through May 1. Preview both shows at this link.

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7/3: Christopher Bales – Archetypal Memory at La Luz de Jesus Gallery


CHRISTOPHER BALES
Archetypal Memory
Showing with Click Mort, Aaron Rivera, Edward Robin Coronel

July 3 – August 2, 2015
Artist reception: Friday, July 3rd; 8-11PM

LA LUZ DE JESUS GALLERY
4633 Hollywood Blvd,
Los Angeles, CA 90027
(323) 666-7667
www.laluzdejesus.com

 

 

Garage sales, flea markets, antique stores, junk yards: these are places you might find me rummaging over display tables or inside water stained boxes looking for any object that asks me politely to take it home. I place my excavations on one of dozens of dusty shelves where they may sit for years waiting to be put to use.

My sculptures are created in a similar way. I start by collecting a pile of objects. The artwork defines itself as these seemingly unrelated items are constructed. Sometimes the concept is immediately clear, other times I have to wait for it to be finished to find the meaning. This subliminal way of working preserves the mystery and spontaneity in my art, managing to keep the process fresh.

My work represents oddities I have discovered stumbling around the attic of my subconscious, touching on universal icons that find their way to the surface. My hope is that the viewer will be disturbed, amused, intrigued, or at least curious about what I have created.- Christopher Bales


It seems cheap to pigeonhole assemblage artist Christopher Bales‘ work as merely steampunk: His aesthetic is older than that. Although he sometimes uses antique and vintage materials associated with the genre, such as metal cogs, the final product often looks more like an altar constructed from the rubble of a pre-Victorian cathedral. Bales, who has been assembling these intricate sculptures since 1989, said he sources “an enormous amount of objects”-like broken wooden boxes, dolls, clocks, picture frames, figurines-from his weekly visits to flea markets and thrift stores. When he starts a new piece, he says he doesn’t have a preconceived notion of what the end result will be, but following his intuition when layering cutouts of classic paintings over etchings with skulls and religious imagery creates enough detail for the viewer to stay engaged but not overwhelmed. -Shoka, Sacramento Bee

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